May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month—the perfect time to review how to protect your skin from photo-damage. Although the skin is the largest organ in the body, it often isn’t cared for properly. Since most skin cancers are linked to sun exposure, it’s important to take precautions outlined by The American Academy of Dermatology(www.aad.org) whenever spending time outdoors.  

  • Use sunscreen with broad-spectrum protection — with an SPF of at least 30 — containing both ultraviolet UVA and UVB protection. Reapply frequently, at least every 2 hours when outdoors, especially after perspiring, swimming or towel drying. Sun care products are here. Many people underapply sunscreen so plan to use a larger amount than you think is needed.
  • Seek shade whenever possible, remembering that the sun’s rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Even on cloudy days, up to 80% of the sun’s harmful UV rays can penetrate the skin.
  • Dress to protect yourself from the sun by wearing a lightweight long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses that provide UV-protection.  Look for UPF, which stands for Ultraviolet Protection Factor, on labels of clothing, hats and fabrics. 
  • Use extra caution near water, snow and sand as these reflect the damaging rays of the sun, increasing your chance of sunburn.
  • Get enough vitamin D—with sensible sun exposure.  There’s no getting around it: the best source of vitamin D is the sun. It’s actually good to be in the sun for a defined period of time – depending on the time of year/day, latitude, and degree of skin pigmentation.   That translates to roughly 10-15 minutes of brief sun exposure to the arms and legs 2-3 times per week.
  • Avoid tanning beds. Ultraviolet light from the sun and tanning beds can cause skin cancer and premature aging. If you want to look tan, try a self-tanning product, but always use sunscreen with it.
  • Perform regular skin self-exams to detect skin cancer early, when it’s most treatable, and see a board-certified dermatologist if you notice new or suspicious spots on your skin, or anything changing, itching or bleeding.In addition to causing skin cancer, sun exposure can also cause premature aging such as wrinkling, redness and uneven skin tone. Precancerous lesions and skin cancer occur when the DNA of skin cells is damaged. Following a daily skincare regimen that includes sunscreen can reduce your exposure to the sun’s UV radiation. Even if you’re not planning to sit out in the sun, always use sunscreen as the last step in your daily routine.

    In addition to causing skin cancer, sun exposure can also cause premature aging such as wrinkling, redness and uneven skin tone. Precancerous lesions and skin cancer occur when the DNA of skin cells is damaged. Following a daily skincare regimen that includes sunscreen can reduce your exposure to the sun’s UV radiation. Even if you’re not planning to sit out in the sun, always use sunscreen as the last step in your daily routine.  

    We suggest Revercel’s Triple Duty Plus SPF 35+. A 100% all-physical mineral formulation with broad-spectrum UVA/UVB sun protection, sheer tint for an even glow, and an advanced lipopeptide complex that offers superior anti-aging benefits.

    You might also like to try Revercel’s oil-free AM Daily Moisturizer SPF 45+. Formulated with hyaluronic and lactic acids and vitamins E and B5, AM protects the skin from harmful UVA and UVB rays while helping it appear younger and smoother.

    It’s estimated that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. Anyone can get skin cancer, regardless of age, gender or skin tone. While many can be cured with early detection, the best approach is prevention.  Make sun-protection an everyday habit, everywhere you go.